7061 East Pleasant Valley Road, Independence, Ohio 44131 • (216) 241-2630 / Fax: (216) 241-6516

Membership
Benefits
News and Issues
Departments
Information
Secretary-Treasurer
Merchandise
Communications
FELA
Events
Links
User Info

Ky. starts new rail tracking system

(The following story by Stephenie Steitzer appeared on The Louisville Courier-Journal website on August 2.)

FRANKFORT, Ky. — CSX Transportation has begun sharing information with the state so officials can track trains carrying dangerous cargo.

The information is expected to help prevent terrorist attacks and improve the response to accidents such as the January derailment of a train carrying hazardous material that forced 500 Bullitt County residents from their homes, officials said.

"It will greatly improve rail transport security in the commonwealth," Gov. Ernie Fletcher said during a press conference yesterday in the Capitol Rotunda. "This information is critical for homeland security, obviously. It will also be critical for emergency responders."

But some critics say tracking dangerous cargo will not prevent it from being used as a weapon of mass destruction.

"You can know where a product is and that's all well and good, but unless you've taken specific measures in providing for the security of that transport, it's a non-issue," said Mike Brown, deputy director of the Louisville Metro Emergency Management Agency.

Officials say the program will cost taxpayers nothing.

After the press conference, officials demonstrated how the CSX information will be used at the state's intelligence-sharing office, dubbed the Fusion Center.

Tom Murta, director of infrastructure protection with CSX of Jacksonville, Fla., showed that there were 1,061 trains running yesterday afternoon in 23 states.

He also pointed out on a computer screen that trains carrying hazardous material were passing through Eastern Kentucky and Russell County in south-central Kentucky.

The train in Russell was carrying compressed gas, such as propane tanks, and was headed toward Indianapolis.

Alecia Webb-Edgington, director of the Kentucky Office of Homeland Security, said the state has set up radiation detection equipment in weigh stations and eventually would be able to similarly track tractor-trailers that are hauling dangerous materials.

"Anytime you have increased information and intelligence … it allows us the opportunity to make citizens of the commonwealth more secure," she said.

Friday, August 3, 2007

Like us on Facebook at
Facebook.com/BLETNational

Sign up for BLET News Flash Alerts

© 1997-2019 Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen

 


Decertification Helpline
(216) 694-0240

Sign up for BLET
News Flash Alerts

DAILY HEADLINES

U.S. House votes to block rail tank cars of LNG
Will U.S. rail volumes take a hit from the proposed U.S. tariffs on China?
Facebook fishing trip video dooms rail worker’s FMLA claim
Conrail conductor alleges railroad attempted to interfere with medical care
CN to report Q2 2019 earnings on July 23
Canada’s crude by rail traffic jumps 40 percent
Mobile hesitates on backing coastal Amtrak return
Virgin Trains USA begins Orlando extension
Amtrak suspends service to and from Norfolk after NS coal train derailment
The Empire Builder: Still rolling at 90
RRB issues statements of service (Form BA-6)
RRB Q&A: Reporting events that can affect retirement benefits
Get the latest labor news from the Teamsters

More Headlines