7061 East Pleasant Valley Road, Independence, Ohio 44131 • (216) 241-2630 / Fax: (216) 241-6516

Membership
Benefits
News and Issues
Departments
Information
Secretary-Treasurer
Merchandise
Communications
FELA
Events
Links
User Info

D.C. backs off hazardous cargo ban for now

(The Associated Press circulated the following article on April 6.)

WASHINGTON -- A federal judge urged the District of Columbia government and CSX Transportation on Tuesday to settle their dispute over rail shipments of hazardous materials through the city and asked President Bush (website - news - bio) to furnish information that would be critical to a deal.

The city government agreed to tentatively delay enforcing a ban on hazardous cargo shipments that was to take effect next Monday after U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan proposed a 30-day cooling-off period for settlement talks. The judge has proposed that the city delay enforcing the ban and that CSX refrain from moving the cargo on rails in the district during the 30 days, The Washington Post reported. Sullivan expressed optimism that a deal could be reached after receiving a private briefing Monday on the federal government's efforts to secure rail lines in the city.

"We need to spend our money and time trying to settle this case so everyone can leave with their heads held high, knowing the security of the District residents remains paramount," Sullivan said.

The judge also urged President Bush to instruct the Justice Department to provide as much information as possible to senior D.C. officials about the work to safeguard District rail lines.

"I need the president's help," Sullivan said. "There is no way I can broker this deal if the District is left totally in the dark about what the federal government is doing. They have to know what I know."

Mayor Anthony Williams (website - news - bio) signed a law in February that prohibits the shipment of hazardous materials on the 37 miles of rail lines in the city. City leaders contend that the nation's capital is a probable target for terrorist attacks, and that 10,000 people could be killed in an attack on a rail car loaded with propane or chlorine.

CSX is suing to overturn the ban, saying only that the federal government has the power to regulate rail security and that such bans could cripple the nation's rail transportation. The Justice Department is siding with CSX.

Attorneys for all three parties said they would tell Sullivan on Wednesday if they could accept the 30-day cooling-off period.

Wednesday, April 6, 2005

Like us on Facebook at
Facebook.com/BLETNational

Sign up for BLET News Flash Alerts

© 1997-2020 Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen

 


Decertification Helpline
(216) 694-0240

National Negotiations

Sign up for BLET
News Flash Alerts

DAILY HEADLINES

Union Pacific eyes 3,000 fewer workers in 2020
U.S. Class 1 rail headcount tumbles in December 2019
U.S. rail volumes still sluggish
AAR: Rail traffic down for week ending January 18, 2020
Union Pacific shares rise as CEO says U.S.-China trade pact should help end rail slump
Police officer suspects internal coverup by CP Rail in fatal B.C. mountain crash
CP Rail grain car rolls out of control, derails near Field, B.C.
Amtrak ends policy that resulted in $25,000 charge for passengers using wheelchairs
Disabilities group holds demonstration outside Amtrak station in Normal, Ill.
Gov. Murphy cool on permanent revenue source for NJ Transit
Passenger rail advocates await BNSF’s study of expansion costs
RRB Q&A: Working after retirement
Get the latest labor news from the Teamsters

More Headlines