7061 East Pleasant Valley Road, Independence, Ohio 44131 • (216) 241-2630 / Fax: (216) 241-6516

Membership
Benefits
News and Issues
Departments
Information
Secretary-Treasurer
Merchandise
Communications
FELA
Events
Links
User Info

Connecticut transportation prepares for higher terror alert

(The Associated Press circulated the following story by Sarah Coffey on April 2.)

HARTFORD, Conn. -- Security measures that were put in place at Connecticut's train and bus stations following last month's bombings in Spain will be maintained following a new government alert that terrorists might target buses and rail lines in major U.S. cities this summer.

The FBI and Homeland Security Department sent a bulletin Thursday saying terrorists could attempt to conceal explosives in luggage and carry-on bags, such as duffel bags and backpacks.

Passengers could see changes because of the bulletin. Federal officials are encouraging local transit authorities to conduct random passenger inspections and security sweeps of stations and to increase public announcements encouraging people to report unattended baggage or suspicious behavior.

State troopers from Connecticut and New York will continue to ride Metro-North commuter trains, Metropolitan Transit Authority spokesman Tom Kelly said. Bomb-sniffing dogs will randomly sniff luggage, and other measures have also been taken, he said.

"Many times security's been increased without people even knowing it has," he said.

State Department of Transportation spokesman Chris Cooper said uniformed and plain clothes security officers will also continue to ride Shoreline East and Amtrak trains.

Kimberly Vasquez, 24, rides the Amtrak train once a week between Hartford and New York City. She said following Sept. 11 she takes care to be more vigilant in public places.

"But if it's going to happen, it's going to happen," she said. "It's scary, but I don't know what else I can do."

DOT Transit Administrator Michael Sanders said officials conducted drills in January involving a hijacked bus and bombs on trains.

Officials have talked about screening luggage on buses, but decided the costs and time involved in screening passengers would be prohibitive.

Passengers should feel safe but be alert, he said.

"There's no way that I would ever say we can prevent every incident from happening," he said.

Standing on the bus platform at Union Station, Lisa Riccio, 46, of East Hartford said she felt safe putting her 15-year-old daughter alone on a bus to Boston to visit her sister in college.

"Why let them stop me from doing my everyday thing?" she said.

German native Cathleen Tauseh, 20, is living in Hartford for a year while working as an au pair. She said she felt safe boarding a bus to New York City to catch a flight out of J.F.K. Airport back to Germany.

"There's enough security. If something will happen it will happen. There's nothing I can do about it," she said.

Monday, April 5, 2004

Like us on Facebook at
Facebook.com/BLETNational

Sign up for BLET News Flash Alerts

© 1997-2019 Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen

 


Decertification Helpline
(216) 694-0240

Sign up for BLET
News Flash Alerts

DAILY HEADLINES

U.S. House votes to block rail tank cars of LNG
Will U.S. rail volumes take a hit from the proposed U.S. tariffs on China?
Facebook fishing trip video dooms rail worker’s FMLA claim
Conrail conductor alleges railroad attempted to interfere with medical care
CN to report Q2 2019 earnings on July 23
Canada’s crude by rail traffic jumps 40 percent
Mobile hesitates on backing coastal Amtrak return
Virgin Trains USA begins Orlando extension
Amtrak suspends service to and from Norfolk after NS coal train derailment
The Empire Builder: Still rolling at 90
RRB issues statements of service (Form BA-6)
RRB Q&A: Reporting events that can affect retirement benefits
Get the latest labor news from the Teamsters

More Headlines